Concorde G-BOAC

Registration Mark – G-BOAC

Current Registration Date - 11/08/1980

Registration Status & Reason - De-registered 04/05/2004 (Permanently withdrawn from use)

Known as – Alpha Charlie or 204

Manufacturer’s Serial Number – 100-004

Production Type – Concorde Type 1 Variant 100-102

Manufacturing Number - 5102-01

Manufacturer - BRITISH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

Assembled at - BAC Filton Bristol, UK

Year Built - 1975

Aircraft Class - Fixed-Wing Landplane

Engines - 4 x Rolls-Royce Olympus 593 MK 610-14-28

Max Take-off Weight - 185070kg

Registered Owners - BRITISH AIRWAYS PLC, WATERSIDE (HBA3), PO BOX 365, HARMONDSWORTH, WEST DRAYTON, UB7 0GB

Maiden Flight – 27th February 1975 : Filton, England

Final Flight - October 31st 2003 – LHR – MAN

On the 31st October 2003, Concorde G-BOAC, flight number BA9020C, left Heathrow for Manchester on her final journey. On the flightdeck that day were Captain Paul Douglas, Captain Mike Bannister, Engineering Flight Officer Robert Woodcock and Engineering Flight Officer Trevor Norcutt. After 27 years in service, Alpha Charlie had flown for 22,260 hours and made 7,730 landings.

British Airways delivery – 13th February 1976

Registration history –

  • First Registered as G-BOAC on 3rd April 1974 to the British Aircraft Corporation Ltd
  • 5th January 1979 aircraft re-registered as G-N81AC / N81AC by British Airways / Braniff Airways
  • 11th August 1980 aircraft re-registered as G-BOAC by British Airways
  • De-Registered – 4th May 2004

CofA / Permit – (Transport/Passenger) Suspended 16/05/2005

Hours Flown – 22,260 hrs 11mins

Landings – 7 730 landings

Supersonic Flights – 6 761

Current Location – Retired from passenger service to public display at Manchester Airport, UK

Ground power was restored to this airframe by Heritage Concorde during “Project Flagship”

First power-up – 14th March 2011

Final power-up – 26th August 2011

During Project Flagship, all the accumulators were also recharged with nitrogen, and green hydraulic system reservoir was filled using a different type of hydraulic fluid, this was due to the lack of M2V fluid.

Aircraft History –

  1. British Government authority for the production of G-BOAC was given in December 1969
  2. Concorde G-BOAC was initially used by the manufacturers, BAC, to complete the Certificate of airworthiness, which included such areas as air conditioning system checks and auto landing trails. Then after the completion of these tests, she was used alongside the airlines on route proving duties around the world. Alpha Charlie was mainly based in Bahrain but also flew some routes out of Singapore The aircraft was retuned to BAC in 1976 after completing 141 flights to be refurbished for airliner service.
  3. Concorde G-BOAC (affectionately known as ‘Alpha Charlie’) became the second aircraft to join the UK’s Concorde fleet when she was delivered to British Airways on 13 February 1976
  4. Despite the fact that G-BOAC was the second Concorde to be delivered, she is considered to be the flagship of the fleet as she carries the registration plate BOAC – which were the initials of British Overseas Airways Corporation, the airline that merged with BEA (British European Airways) to form British Airways
  5. The aircraft made its first flight on 27 February 1975 and began its ‘endurance’ flying on 7 July that year taking in Bahrain, Bombay, Kuala Lumpur, Singapore, Melbourne, Beirut, Gander and Damascus
  6. On 1 September 1975, G-BOAC became the first aircraft to make four Atlantic crossings in one day. It flew between London and Gander, Newfoundland
  7. After months of discussions between the UK and US Governments, Alpha Charlie was the first Concorde in commercial service to land on US soil at Washington Dulles airport on 24 May 1976
  8. On 19 December 1985, G-BOAC travelled at 1,488 mph, the highest recorded ground speed for a commercial airliner
  9. To mark 10 years in service, four British Airways Concorde’s – including G-BOAC – flew in formation over the Atlantic
  10. During 2011 The Heritage Concorde engineers under the leadership of Ian Mosdell, restored power to the aircraft while it was being stored at Manchester Airport, Steve de Sausmarez powered the aircraft for the first time on the 14th March and Katie John for the final time on the 26th August 2011. The aircraft hasn’t been powered since.

    Notes

    She is known as Alpha Charlie, and British Airways considers her to be the Flagship of BA and their Concorde Fleet as it carries the letters ‘BOAC’ which were also the initials of the British Overseas Airways Corporation, the forerunner, along with British European Airlines, to British Airways. G-BOAC was the aircraft chosen to launch the Washington service on the 26th of May 1976. It is the oldest Concorde in the BA fleet, although not the oldest officially owned by BA (that honour falls to G-BOAA), it is also the heaviest; mainly due to the fact that it was one of the first built and the other aircraft all benefited from the design being tweaked and the weight being reduced as production went along.

    This airframe was the one that was restored to life by Heritage Concorde on the 14th March 2011; this was the first time the aircraft was powered-up since 2003. This power-up was carried out during task and works to the aircraft as part of Heritage Concorde “Project Flagship”

    She was last powered-up on the 26th August 2011, the project was then cancelled and this followed by a fight to restore power to the aircraft once again by another group calling themselves “Concorde Tech”, they have called their project “Concorde Project Flagship”, and they claim to have been the team that have carried out the first power-up’s, this is due to the fact two of the members of this new group were former members of the much larger Heritage Concorde team.

    To visit this Concorde today – CLICK HERE!

    PICTURES OF CONCORDE G-BOAC, “Alpha Charlie”

    G-BOAC taxies after an early test flight. Note the RAT deployed


    204 carring the registration G-N81AC in TBB at Heathrow

    204 carring the registration G-N81AC in TBB at Heathrow

    G-BOAC taking off: Picture courtesy of BA Concorde Engineer John Dunlevy

    This is Kristine Szulik's photo of G-BOAC at Manchester during the Jubilee celebrations.

    CAA AIRWORTHINESS NOTES FOR THIS AIRCRAFT

    AIRWORTHINESS APPROVAL NOTE NO: 23819 Addendum 2 Issue 3

    APPLICANT: British Airways

    AIRCRAFT TYPE: Concorde

    REGISTRATION NO: G-BOAC

    CONSTRUCTOR’S NO: 100-004

    British Airways Modification 25F 243

    Enhancement of Concorde Main Passenger and Galley Areas

    1. Introduction

    The applicant has raised this omnibus modification to include the modifications required for the enhancement of the Concorde main passenger cabin and galley areas. This was originally going to be cleared under AAN 23819 to clear Mod 33F078 Cabin Ceiling Lighting, and the remainder on Addendum 1 to AAN 23819. However Addendum 1 was raised to clear Mod 25F260 New Seat Installation, as this was required to be installed on an in-service aeroplane. Hence this Addendum 2 to AAN 23819 covers the remaining modifications included under omnibus Modification 25F243.

    Issue 2 of this Addendum was raised to correct and complete Issue 1 which was transmitted to cover the issue of a Permit to Fly for Test Purposes on 8th June 1993, and to extend the approval to cover installation on Concorde Aeroplanes operating under the conditions of a C of A in the Transport Category (Passenger).

    This Issue 3 to AAN 23819 Addendum 2 has been raised to cover the incorporation of

    Henshall SB 278 which calls for an additional latch to the waste door on Galley G7. The modification has been raised to Issue G to include this feature as part of BA Mod No. 25F240, Galley refurbishment.

    2. Description of Modification

    This omnibus modification incorporates a number of modifications which are described below:

    Mod No 25F260: New Seat Installation. See Addendum 1 to this AAN.

    Mod No 33F078: Cabin Ceiling Lighting. See AAN 23819.

    The remaining modifications described below are all cleared under this Addendum 2 to AAN 23819.

    25F240 Concorde Galley Refurbishment: Classified Major

    This Mod removes existing G2, G4 and the FWD cabin amenity stowage and discards.

    New G2, G4 and cabin amenity stowages have been designed and manufactured by

    Hensalls Ltd. See Henshalls Mod No HEN 367 which is approved under AAN 23717

    G7 has been removed and reworked to accept the installation of Rumbold Bev Maker and Aerolux Warming Compartment.

    Installation of new insert equipment is not covered by the above AAN and is as follows:-

    Description Vendor Part No. CAA Approval

    DOUBLE OVEN RUMBOLD 61074-001-001 SA01097

    BEV MAKER RUMBOLD {64761 SA58

    {64759-1 SA58

    {64751-1 SA58

    WARMING COMPT AEROLUX AL-OU50-101 SA01099

    The CAA granted a concession for the Double Oven and Warming Compartment to be used on passenger carrying services until 31 July 1993, (letter reference: 9/214/V1684/GBOAF dated 11 June 1993).

    25F244 Iss C Installation of Extended Overhead Bins: Classified Major

    Replaces 44 off existing overhead baggage bins with bins extended inboard laterally to increase volumetric capacity. (Max stowage weight allowed in bins is reduced to take account of increased empty weight).

    The weight increase per aircraft set will be revised at Issue D to 14.5 Kg reflecting the weight of the first production set.

    Stress and flammability requirements are covered by Fliteform Mod AF 915 as specified on sheet 2 of Omnibus Mod 25F243. Fliteform Mod AF915 is approved under AAN

    23767

    25F245 Iss C Installation of Pax Cabin light Lenses

    This Mod completely removes the transverse denticular (Tooth like) light lenses and replaces the 24 off longitudinal light lenses above the overhead bins with lenses made from new material (Opal polycarbonate F6) which has improved translucency and yellowing resistance otherwise the form remains the same.

    The adjacent ceiling infill panels which supported the denticular lenses are removed to have slots filled and Tedlar surface replaced before refitting. The overall weight change is

    a reduction of 9 Kg per A/C.

    Flammability requirements are covered by Fliteform Mod AF 915 as specified on sheet 2 of Omnibus Mod 25F243. This modification is also approved under AAN 23767.

    25F246 Iss B Installation of Entry Way Ceiling Lights

    This is the fitment of a more aesthetic lens cover to replace the rectangular ones existing in each vestibule area ceiling (4 places). The material from which these are made is opal polycarbonate F6 as for the longitudinal light lenses (Mod 25F245).

    Flammability requirements are covered by Fliteform Mod AF 915 as specified on sheet 2 of Omnibus Mod 25F243, and is also approved under AAN 23767.

    25F247 Iss A Vestibule Door FWD/CENTRE/AFT

    This Mod replaces the decorative Tedlar materials on all longitudinal vertical walls of toilets, wardrobes and galleys in each of the three vestibule areas. It also covers decoration of the athwartship vertical forward facing face of the rearmost galley and its adjacent stowages.

    Previously painted extruded edge members of associated units are to be re-finished using approved ICI paint ref: F427-3020 + activator F210-746 + thinner 851-808.

    The new Tedlar (Polyplastex BAPP FX6 CON 03-1) complies with CAA spec 8 and JAR

    25.853, and is the same material as that used on the Henshall galleys, fire test report

    FTP/NMM/5961 refers.

    25F248 Iss A Revised Bulkhead Decor

    This Mod replaces decorative Tedlar materials on all athwartships vertical walls of galleys, toilets and wardrobes facing the rearmost galleys and adjacent stowages.

    Previously painted extruded edge members of associated units are to be re-finished using approved ICI paint ref: F427-3019 + activator F210-746 + thinner 851-808.

    The new Tedlar (Polyplastex BAPP FX6 CON 02-1) complies with CAA spec 8 and JAR

    25.853, and is the same material as that used on Henshall galleys, fire test report

    FTP/NMM/5961 refers.

    25F249 Iss A Pax Cabin Ceiling Repaint

    The Mod removes ceiling panels from passengers cabin and vestibule areas and re-paints them before re-fitting using ICI paint ref F427-3951 + activator F210-746 + thinner 851-

    808.

    Some areas adjacent to rearmost galley where panels are not readily removed are brush painted using acrylic paint ICI ref PP407c9081×1L.

    25F250 Iss A Mirrors/Toilets/Vase Installation

    Old bronze tinted mirrors will be replaced with chrome mirror of identical material (ie

    Mitsubishi AK 1103) no weight changes.

    Toiletries holder consists of an open topped box 2″ deep approx 7½” long and 5¾” wide manufactured from polyester glass cloth and Nomex core finished in imitation marble gel coat. It is restrained on the shelf above the sink by plug-in studs. Flammability Data

    Sheet No. 10-298 issued by Hunting Aircraft Ltd, refers.

    The vase is fitted to one of the mirrors using double sided self adhesive tape this method is identical to that already used on 747 first class toilets.

    25F251 Iss A Refurbishment of Door Surrounds

    This involves various items such as fairings, close out flaps, pads etc associated with the pax doorways and emergency escape slide packs at doors 1 & 2 L & R. The materials used comply with CAA Spec 8.

    25F252 Iss A Enhancement of Pull Down Tables

    These are returned to original manufacturers (fliteform) to restore paint finish to original standard. The pull down tables is situated on bulkheads at stns 532 & 1015.

    25F255 Iss B Refurbishment of Trim Strips Inbd of PSU’s

    These are painted strips 3″ wide situated between the PSU’s and Overhead bins which are chipped and blistered. They cannot readily be removed from the aircraft.

    The strips are therefore covered in situ in white Tedlar (Polyplastex FX 6-CO-PSA/319), as used on other areas of the aeroplane.

    38F083 Mod to Pressure Reducing Valve

    New beverage makers require higher potable water pressure to operate. The pressure reducing valve is fitted with internal replacement items (eg spring and spacer), and reidentified to convert as necessary.

    25F401 Iss A Linen Towel Dispenser for Toilets

    This Mod provides a redesigned towel dispenser made by Metair in each toilet to left of hand basin to replace existing dispenser. Applicable flammability Data Sheets No’s 10- 301/302 issued by Hunting Aircraft Ltd refer.

    25F295 New PSU’s

    This Mod provides new PSU’s manufactured by Hella (Germany), specifically for Concorde. The modification does not change the aircraft wiring or power distribution system. The opportunity has been taken to add new PA system speakers at the rear of the forward and aft cabins. This is to improve the existing PA system which meets CAA Spec 15 on the ground but not in supersonic cruise. A non-conditional concession has been granted by the CAA to allow continued operation. A RASTI test is to be completed after installation.

    The Technical Statement Ref EEG.2.AEM.2382 M2-14 is acceptable to the CAA. DDP’s

    007 284-01/-02 (PSU), 007 285-01/-02 (loudspeaker panel) and 007 286-00/05 (oxygen cover and mounting parts) also refer. The materials used in the modified units comply with JAR 25.853, AN61 and CAA Spec 8 where applicable. The new PSU installation reduces the electrical load to that previously due to improved Halogen filaments which provide more light for less power.

    3. Certification Basis

    The certification basis used for the approval of these modifications is CAA Spec 8 as a minimum standard for the flammability aspects and Airworthiness Notice No 99 for the galley inserts.

    4. Technical Investigation

    The applicant has confirmed that the requirements referred to above and other applicable requirements have been complied with, where appropriate and this has been accepted by the CAA.

    Similarly the applicant has confirmed that the electrical load analysis has not been exceeded.

    5. Technical Publications

    The Flight Manual and Approved Servicing Schedule are not affected by this omnibus modification. The maintenance manual and wiring diagrams are being amended accordingly.

    6. Weight and Balance

    The basic weight and C G position are affected by this modification. The changes are covered by calculation and the Weight and Balance Manual has been amended accordingly.

    7. Inspection

    The aeroplane, when inspected by the CAA, was found to conform to the applicants

    drawings and data and was considered to be satisfactory.

    8. Approval

    This omnibus modification No 25F243 is approved at Issue G for installation on Concorde aeroplanes. The individual modifications referred to in this AAN are also approved to be installed on their own or in any combination in Concorde aeroplanes.

    J G Wraith

    ……………………………………………..

    For the Civil Aviation Authority

    Date 24th August 1995

    FLIGHT INCIDENT REPORTS FOR THIS AIRCRAFT

    Concorde Registration: G-BOAC

    AAIB Bulletin No: 6/2004 Ref: EW/C2003/06/03 Category: 1.1

    Registration: Concorde Type 1 V102, G-BOAC

    Year of Manufacture: 1975

    Date & Time (UTC): 13 June 2003, time unknown

    Location: Transatlantic cruise

    Type of Flight: Public Transport (Passenger)

    Persons on Board: Crew – 9 / Passengers – 98

    Nature of Damage: Fire damage in under wing area

    Commander’s Licence: Airline Transport Pilot’s Licence

    Commander’s Age: 55 years

    Commander’s Flying Experience: 17,000 hours (of which 2,200 were on type) Last 90 days – 60 hours / Last 28 days – 20 hours

    Synopsis

    On 21 June 2003, during the routine maintenance investigation of a reported defect, a short circuit

    Condition was detected on the Fuel Quantity Indication wiring for fuel tank No 7. Damage was found

    To an associated wire bundle which had been caused by a localised fire within the area enclosed by the wing/fuselage fairing area aft of the main landing gear (zone 198) below fuel tank No 3. Fuel seepage from this tank, in the area of the chafed wire, had collected in a box section fairing support member and had been ignited, resulting in a short duration, low intensity fire. The ignition source for the fire was identified as a chafed wire for the main tank No 3 fuel pump, which carries 115V AC power, arcing against the aluminium fairing. It was possible that the chafing of this wire had been precipitated during maintenance activity two years prior to the incident when this wiring had been disturbed. The fire probably occurred during a flight from LHR to JFK on 13 June 2003, although no indications were apparent to the flight crew at that time. Modifications have since been introduced to prevent the build up of fuel in the box section fairing support structure.

    History of Flight

    On 21 June 2003, the aircraft was to fly from London Heathrow (LHR) to New York (JFK) airport.

    Prior to the flight the failure flag for the No 7 fuel tank gauge had been in view, indicating that the gauge was unserviceable, and it was indicating 1,500 kg. However, the fuel tank, which holds

    7,480 kg, was full. The gauge was interchanged with that for the No 5 fuel tank, but the defect remained. The fuel quantity packs were then interchanged, but the defect persisted. A description of the fault was entered into the aircraft’s Technical Log and the aircraft departed with the No 7 tank gauge unserviceable, in accordance with the minimum equipment list (MEL). Approximately one hour after takeoff, the failure flag disappeared and the fuel gauge appeared to work correctly for the remainder of the flight.

    Prior to refuelling for the return flight, the contents of the No 7 fuel tank were physically checked and confirmed as being correct. After refuelling, with the No 7 tank full, the gauge again indicated a total of 1,500 kg but on this occasion there was no failure flag in view. There was now, however, a failure flag displayed on the No 5 tank fuel gauge. Once more, the No 5 and No 7 fuel gauges and fuel quantity packs were interchanged, but the defects remained. (Under the conditions of the MEL the aircraft was not permitted to depart with two fuel gauges unserviceable.) The centre of gravity (CG) computer also displayed a failure warning flag, although the indications appeared to be correct.

    Whilst the engineering analysis continued, the failure warning flags for the No 5 fuel tank gauge and the CG computer cleared and so the aircraft once again departed under the conditions of the MEL.

    When in the supersonic cruise phase of flight, the No 7 fuel tank gauge began to indicate correctly.

    However, all other fuel tank gauges, except those for tanks 4, 5A, 9, 10 and 11, displayed failure flags intermittently for the remainder of the flight. At no time did any of the gauges fail. The failure flag for the CG computer also re-appeared but the CG reading corresponded closely with the calculated value. The failure flags for the No 2 and No 3 fuel tank gauges remained in view for most of the flight, although the indications on these gauges were considered by the crew to be accurate. During the flight the crew had contacted the operator’s engineering control to advise them of the multiple fuel gauges failure flags. After flight, when the engines were shut down all of the failure flags disappeared from view and the flight engineer fully debriefed the ground engineering staff.

    Fuel system

    On Concorde, the fuel system has three functions; to supply fuel to the engines, to control the position of the aircraft CG and to act as a heat sink to absorb kinetic heating from the structure and to dissipate heat generated by the air-conditioning and hydraulic systems. Fuel is stored in thirteen integral tanks.

    These are arranged in three groups; the left main transfer group, the right main transfer group and the trim transfer group. The left and right main transfer groups store fuel in the wings and sections of the centre fuselage, and both groups are comprised of three main tanks which supply two collector tanks per group, from which the engines are fed. The collector tanks on the right main transfer group are tank Nos 3 and 4, which feed engines Nos 3 and 4 respectively. The main fuel transfer system transfers fuel from the main transfer tanks to the collector tanks at a rate sufficiently high to ensure that the collector tanks are always maintained in a near full condition. Fuel is transferred from each tank by electrically driven pumps, which can be manually controlled, to match an automatic sequence of mechanically operated transfer valves which are governed by float sensors in the tanks receiving the fuel.

    A fuel quantity indication (FQI) system shows the level of individual and total tank contents. The system is also used to provide an indication of the aircraft’s CG. Tank Nos 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 have magnetic fuel level indicators installed to provide an underwing method of manually checking the contents of these tanks. These indicators are intended to be used when a fuel quantity gauge has failed, or when the fuel quantity probes are suspected of giving incorrect signals. Gauge failure is indicated by the display of a warning flag.

    Each collector tank is equipped with main and standby 115V AC electric motor driven pumps. The electrical loads of the fuel system are supplied from the aircraft’s electrical power system via circuit breakers on the distribution busbars. The main AC and DC circuit breakers are located above the equipment racks on both sides of the flight compartment; the essential AC and DC circuit breakers are located forward of the racks on the left side.

    Fuel leaks

    The fuel tanks are formed as sealed cells integral with the wing, centre fuselage and rear fuselage structure. Intermediate ribs and spars within the tanks reduce fuel surging and sloshing. As a result of recent modifications, tank Nos 5, 6, 7 and 8 are fitted with liners on the wing lower surface, which limit fuel leakage to a minimum in case of foreign object damage. The tanks also have structural expansion joints, located on the lower surface between the wing and fuselage, to allow for expansion and contraction of the aircraft structure caused by the thermal cycle induced by the supersonic/subsonic flight profile. The expansion joints are formed from two top hat sections which ramp down to a flat surface at either end where they attach to the spar cap flanges. The inner expansion joint forms part of the aircraft fuel tanks.

    As a result of these sealed cells expanding and contracting, as part of normal flight, cracks can develop, which results in fuel seepage/leakage from the tanks. Fuel leaks are continually assessed by engineering staff and monitored in accordance with the Aircraft Maintenance Manual (AMM). They are categorised as ’seepage’ or a ‘running leak’. Seepage is assessed for an area six inches square such that once the area is wiped clean, fuel should not flow or fall in droplets for a period of 15 minutes.

    For a ‘running leak’, fuel reappears immediately after the surface is wiped clean and falls in drops; the leak rate is assessed as the number of drops per minute. Allowable fuel leaks and seepage are classified by specific aircraft regions, according to risk, and are detailed in the AMM. For seepage or a running leak of less than 15 drops per minute, no immediate action is required for some areas, but frequent checks must be conducted to ensure that a leak is not worsening and repair work must carried out at the next scheduled maintenance check. For other, more critical areas with the same condition, repairs are required before the next flight.

    There were no fuel leaks being monitored in the area of tank No 3 around the time of the incident.

    History of reported defects in the FQI system

    The aircraft flew a sector from LHR to JFK on 13 June 2003. During refuelling operations at JFK engineers noted that tank No 7 fuel gauge had failed. The tank was filled and the quantity checked using the tank No 7 magnetic fuel level indicator and the aircraft returned to LHR where the FQI probe in the tank was replaced. A functional check was performed satisfactorily.

    The aircraft next flew to JFK on 20 June 2003, subsequent to which it was reported that the FQI gauge had a ‘fail’ flag visible and that it read incorrectly. The aircraft was dispatched from JFK on

    21 June 2003 with this allowable deferred defect but, during the return flight the crew reported multiple ‘fail’ flags on several fuel gauges (as described in the ‘History of Flight’), and that fuel was slow to transfer from tank No 3 to tank No 7A during the descent.

    During investigation of the reported defect on tank No 7 FQI, a short circuit condition was identified in the wiring. Further investigation revealed that this had been caused by a short duration, low intensity fire inside the wing to body fairings below fuel tank No 3 on the right side of the aircraft.

    Aircraft examination

    The area damaged by the fire was contained within the wing/fuselage fairing area aft of the main landing gear, below and adjacent to tank No 3 (zone 198),

    The chaffing of the wire on the inner aluminium skin of the honeycomb filled panel eventually led to an electrical arc of a 115V AC supply, which ignited the fuel/air mixture. The fire had also caused damage to the FQI wiring, leading to the reported defects, initially on tank No 7 FQI system and then on other tank FQI systems and the CG computer. Although there was fire damage to the FQI and No

    3 fuel pump wiring, there was no evidence of arc-tracking along the length of the wires. Arc tracking is not a feature associated with the Concorde PTFE wiring insulation.

    The fire had damaged a number of nylon clamp blocks supporting hydraulic pipes. The hydraulic pipe clamps are made from Polyamide (Nylon) 66, which has a heat distortion temperature (i.e. the temperature at which the material will flow) of between 150°C and 180°C, and a melting temperature of 264°C. Around the area of the ‘box’ section of the fairing support structure outboard of the chaffed wire, the pipe clamps displayed varying thermal effects. Some clamps had been completely consumed while others had been burnt and the material had flowed. Below one group of hydraulic pipes a ‘pool’ of burnt pipe clamp material had formed by melting and then flowing onto the inside of the fairing panel 198CB. The surface of the burnt material was black and smooth, indicating flow had continued after the burning had finished, although one small area had a rough texture indicating that the burning had continued here for a longer period. Around the ‘pool’ there was evidence of plastic spatter on the fairing. The lack of damage to the fairing panel suggested that burning of the hydraulic pipe clamps was localised and of low heat intensity. There was no apparent damage to the inner painted surface of the fairing panel and no delaminating had occurred.

    During the flight, tank No 3 main fuel pump circuit breaker did not trip and the pump had continued to operate, despite the chafed wire and arcing to the panel. The circuit breaker was of the conventional thermal/mechanical type, and this was removed and later tested satisfactorily. (This type of circuit breaker is designed to protect against electrical overheating of wires and does not protect against transient arcing faults, which develop high energy over a very short period of time.)

    The area under tank No 3 in the region of the fire, was cleaned and examined for fuel leaks. At the forward end of the expansion joint at wing spar 66, one drip of fuel occurred every 6 minutes and an additional drip every 1 minute 40 seconds from the area of the lower panel support structure, Figure 3.

    The bolts on a repair plate on spar 66 were damp but did not form droplets. There was also a drip every minute at the aft end of the expansion joint at spar 68. Zone 198, the region in which the fire occurred, is classed as ‘zone two’ for fuel leakage purposes and seepage only is permitted before repairs are required.

    These are arranged in three groups; the left main transfer group, the right main transfer group and the trim transfer group. The left and right main transfer groups store fuel in the wings and sections of the centre fuselage, and both groups are comprised of three main tanks which supply two collector tanks per group, from which the engines are fed. The collector tanks on the right main transfer group are tank Nos 3 and 4, which feed engines Nos 3 and 4 respectively. The main fuel transfer system transfers fuel from the main transfer tanks to the collector tanks at a rate sufficiently high to ensure that the collector tanks are always maintained in a near full condition. Fuel is transferred from each tank by electrically driven pumps, which can be manually controlled, to match an automatic sequence of mechanically operated transfer valves which are governed by float sensors in the tanks receiving the fuel.

    A fuel quantity indication (FQI) system shows the level of individual and total tank contents. The system is also used to provide an indication of the aircraft’s CG. Tank Nos 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 have magnetic fuel level indicators installed to provide an underwing method of manually checking the contents of these tanks. These indicators are intended to be used when a fuel quantity gauge has failed, or when the fuel quantity probes are suspected of giving incorrect signals. Gauge failure is indicated by the display of a warning flag.

    Each collector tank is equipped with main and standby 115V AC electric motor driven pumps. The electrical loads of the fuel system are supplied from the aircraft’s electrical power system via circuit breakers on the distribution busbars. The main AC and DC circuit breakers are located above the equipment racks on both sides of the flight compartment; the essential AC and DC circuit breakers are located forward of the racks on the left side.

    4th Oct 2003

    Date & Time (UTC): 4 October 2003 at 2320 hrs

    Location: Initial climb and cruise out of London Heathrow Airport

    Persons on Board: Crew – 10 Passengers – 93

    Nature of Damage: Bearing damage to the No 1 and 2 air group cold air units

    Commander’s Licence: Airline Transport Pilot’s Licence

    Commander’s Age: 51 years

    Commander’s Flying Experience: 14,000 hours (of which 2,500 were on type) Last 90 days – 120 hours Last 28 days – 45 hours

    Information Source: Aircraft Accident Report Form submitted by the pilot and follow up telephone inquiries to the operator :~

    During the initial climb after departure from Heathrow, a No 1 Air Group ‘AIR & SMOKE’ amber caption illuminated on the main warning system. A slight smell was discernible by the flight crew and some smoke was visible on the flight deck. The handling pilot (P2) immediately donned his oxygen mask whilst the captain and flight engineer completed the appropriate drills, which included shutting down the No 1 Air Group. Both the smoke and the smell cleared rapidly and, after five minutes, in accordance with the checklist procedures, the No 1 Air Group was reinstated. The warning caption immediately reappeared, however, and the No 1 Air Group was therefore shut down again and left inoperative thereafter. No smell or smoke accompanied the second warning. In all, the co-pilot was on oxygen for less than about three minutes.

    12/14/1981

    London Burst tires 1 and 2 off Hydraulic Bursting FOD yellow GTR half spoiler

    03/08/1984

    New York Burst off Burst tire 2 GTR 2 Impacts wing spoiler

    11/08/1987

    New York Burst tires 1,2,4,5,6 and 8 Brakes Landing Impact 3 GTR Wing Spoiler Fan Hatches train brakes

    03/09/1988

    London Burst tire 5 Landing Hydraulic Brake System

    08 OCT 1998

    British Airways Concorde G-BOAC British Airways flight 001, a partial separation of Experienced the lower rudder while in cruise flight over the North Atlantic off the coast of New Newfoundland. (NTSB)

    25 MAY 1998

    Concorde British Airways G-BOAC While climbing a slight rumble-through FL410 has experienced, which turned out to be the separation of a section of the middle left hand elevons (5ft x 3ft). The aircraft Returned, extensive vibration was Noted-through mach 1.1 with less vibration at Mach 0.90 and during the final approach…

    29 DEC 1978

    Concorde 102 British Airways G-BOAC Was An engine shut down after departing New York. The secondary air door autrement to be inoperative.

    Records and notes from Heritage Concorde Project Flagship

    January 2011 – September 2011

    During Project Flagship, ground power was restored to the aircraft and all the accumulators were also recharged with nitrogen, green hydraulic system reservoir was filled using a different type of hydraulic fluid, this was due to the lack of M2V fluid, and various repairs to the aircraft took place

    PROJECT FLAGSHIP: VISIT TO CONCORDE G-BOAC 20 FEBRUARY 2011

    Ricky Bastin, Ross Williamson, Sue Williamson, Steve de Sausmarez hold an initial meeting at Concorde G-BOAC to discuss the plan for repairing the windows.

    Steve de Sausamarez and Ricky Bastin go on board G-BOAC with Ross Williamson. They carry out a preliminary risk assessment.

    They find the Ground Power Protection Unit and restore it to its correct location. Steve presses the button to reactivate it.

    Steve and Ricky go onto the flight deck with Ross and discuss the hydraulic systems.

    Ricky checks the connection for ground power. He is happy with the state of the wiring.

    Ross, Steve, Ricky and Paul (manager at the Aviation Park) have a meeting afterwards.

    The team discuss the plan put forward by Gordon Roxborough at Brooklands Museum, to repaire the visor and the co-pilot’s main window. The team from Brooklands had suggested carrying out the repair mechanically, and charging an estimated £18,000 for the cost of the team’s time, accommodation, materials, etc.

    Ricky Bastin and Steve de Sausmarez state that they can carry out these repairs at no cost to the museum. Ricky Bastin says the repair can be done by using the aircraft’s hydraulic systems to move the nose and visor.

    Ricky Bastin outlines the following plan for the work:

    • Carry out survey of the aircraft’s condition

    • Power the aircraft’s electrical systems

    • Power the hydraulic systems

    • Carry out repairs to visor and windscreen, which will involve moving the nose and visor hydraulically.

    For the longer term, Ricky Bastin suggestes regularly powering the electrical and hydraulic systems, so the museum can hold events with G-BOAC’s nose being moved.

    The work is cleared for health and safety purposes.

    All agree a return date of the 14th March to start the work.

    PROJECT FLAGSHIP: VISIT TO CONCORDE G-BOAC 14 MARCH 2011

    Ricky Bastin, Ross Williamson, Sue Williamson, Steve de Sausmarez, Ian Mosdell attend a meeting at Concorde G-BOAC to check the electrical power on the aircraft. Katie John attends to take notes. Ellie Bastin attends to take photographs for a visual record of the day.

    Ricky Bastin’s plan for the day

    Ricky sends the following plan to the museum and circulates it to the team:

    WHAT WE REQUIRE FROM YOURSELVES:

    1) The exhibit should of course be closed to the general public while we are carrying out our work.

    2) A 60 to 90 KVA 115/200 400HZ electrical ground power unit (GPU). This is standard Manchester Airport equipment. At least 90KVA would be desirable.

    3) An lengthy output extension reel of about 50 to 60 ish feet , so that the GPU does not need to come inside the exhibition hangar. (The cable can be passed through an opened door etc.). This also should be available somewhere in the airport. It is not a show stopper if one cannot be found, but will make life a lot quieter and less smelly if we can leave the GPU outside.

    4) As is standard for any power up from a long stand-off period (or even a new aircraft for that matter) some basic fire precautions should be available for the initial power up. (This is merely a token precaution as I have carried out a thorough survey of the ground power electrical installation on the aircraft and am more than satisfied with the wiring condition and integrity of same; this was in fact found to be generally first class on our recent visit).

    5) 2 or 3 vacuum cleaners of any shape or description.

    6) A single can of any ‘LO30’ type aerosol cleaner just to quickly clean out the aircraft ground power socket. Please let me know if you are unable to obtain any, and I can try and obtain a can before we come.

    The general itinerary for the day is as follows.

    1) As early as possible (08:00 if that is ok) we would like to carry out a thorough cleaning regime (vacuum cleaners) of the electrical racking in the above floor 215/216 and 243/244 zones as well as the Transformer Rectifier Units etc. in the lower 123 zones. With two or three of us working (I think we will all be killed in the rush to Hoover Concorde) this should take about 1 to 2 hours. All electronic components will then returned to their correct racking location on the aircraft.

    2) Isolation of all but ground power essential electrical loads on the aircraft. ALL cabin lighting circuits will remain isolated, due to 240 volt mains lighting being installed on G-BOAC. The GPU will be started and selected online at the unit. The aircraft ground power switch will be selected to ‘close’ and power will then be applied to the aircraft. As electrical power is established, the aircraft electrical services will be progressively enabled, to establish stability of operation.

    3) The aircraft hydraulic reservoir air compressor will be activated, just to ensure that air pressure can be supplied to the hydraulic reservoirs. (We are assuming that the reservoir air release valves are closed, if not we will gain access and close them ourselves).

    4) After carrying out some basic relevant system checks, the power will then be de-selected and removed from the aircraft, the GPU can then be shut-down and disconnected from the aircraft.

    5) At this point, at your discretion, the exhibit could be re-opened to the general public.

    6) A detailed survey will be carried out by Ian Mosdell as far as hi lift access requirements for the our future visor and windshield glazing repairs. As we stated previously, this work should generally be carried out at zero cost to the museum. (Although coffee and sandwiches would be appreciated by all).

    7) A survey will be also ce carried out to see what will be required to repair the captain’s DV window, currently covered with Perspex.

    8) Access will be gained (via the rear cabin) to the rear freight hold to establish what is required to repair the missing hinge equipment.

    As we discussed previously, absolute confidentiality regarding this event is essential. It is best that we confine details of this event to the interested parties only.

    Sequence of events during the day

    1) Once on the aircraft, the panels just outside the flight deck are opened and control units etc removed for cleaning. The racks are also thoroughly cleaned. The units are then restored to their proper places and secured.

    2) Ian and Ricky open access panels at the rear of the aircraft, clean the units inside. They also open the rear baggage hold and check inside.

    3) The team go out onto the port wing. Ricky and Ian open a couple of the access hatches. They check the heat exchanger, which appears to be in good condition. The adjacent hatch has allowed condensation to leak into the wing structure via a valve in the top, causing localised damp in the area just underneath; this is mopped up and the area left to dry.

    4) A Ground Power Unit is brought into the hangar and securely connected to the aircraft. Power is switched on.

    5) Power is switched on on the flight deck. Lights come on and alarms sound, indicating active systems.

    6) The lights on the wings and tail come on and start flashing. Landing lights on wings rotate into position and come on.

    7) The hydraulic systems are activated. Fluid is pushed from the tanks into the lines. This means that more fluid will be needed to replenish the tanks.

    8) Air intake control systems – it is found that 6 out of the 8 systems work.

    9) Secondary air doors are tested and found to work first time.

    10) Aircraft systems are turned off, the GPU is disconnected and removed, and G-BOAC is made secure for normal museum activities. GPPU is stowed on shelf 10215.

    11) Ricky speaks to Ian Kirby by telephone to update him. Ricky, Steve and Ian Mosdell collect a sample of hydraulic fluid from the aircraft for analysis.

    Next stages to be carried out

    Hydraulic fluid to be topped up

    Accumulators to be recharged

    Items to be obtained for next stages

    • Extra ground power unit – perhaps from East Fortune?

    • Additional supplies of M2V hydraulic fluid – Exxon? Ian Kirby estimates that 4–5 gallons will be needed

    • Hydraulic gun – was carried in Concorde’s “fly away kit” during service

    • 2 lead acid batteries (eg from Boeing 737) to fix nacelle overheats x 3

    • Extra fire detection box (FFFD/ Graviner box)

    • Right-hand extractor fan

    • Set of reheat switches

    • New light under nose

    • Windows – from Brooklands Museum

    PROJECT FLAGSHIP: VISIT TO CONCORDE G-BOAC 27 JUNE 2011

    Ricky Bastin, Ross Williamson, Sue Williamson, Steve de Sausmarez, Ian Mosdell, Pete Messum attend a meeting at Concorde G-BOAC to carry out minor repairs. Katie John attends to take notes. Ellie Bastin attends to take photographs for a visual record of the day. Dr David Jones, a friend of Steve de Sausmarez and Katie John, attends briefly as an observer.

    Preparation

    Supply of spare curved visor panel and windshield from Brooklands Museum

    Ross Williamson and Andy from the museum, with Steve de Sausmarez, collected these parts from Brooklands museum on Saturday 25 June.

    The curved visor panel for the co-pilot’s side is intact, but the windshield is cracked. There is some discussion as to how this could have happened, since the windshields never failed in this way while the Concordes were in service. It is suggested that this windshield might have suffered a severe impact.

    Supply of rollers for DV window

    Pete Messum has machined some new rollers for the DV window.

    Supply of aluminium pipe for ground power unit

    Steve de Sausmarez has supplied an extendable aluminium pipe to be fitted to the ground power unit, to prevent the problems encountered on previous visits.

    Plan for the day

    Get power established

    Power up aircraft and conduct survey for system failures

    Recharge accumulators to push hydraulic fluid back into reservoirs

    If enough hydraulic fluid moves back into the tanks, try to get green system working

    Fit new rollers to DV window

    Sequence of events

    Preparing and turning on ground power unit

    Extendable aluminium pipe fitted to GPU, to direct diesel fumes outside building.

    Ground power protection unit located and re-installed.

    GPU is turned on – but fails to work. It is suggested that the head gasket has blown. Andy (museum) thinks the airport, which owns the GPU, will be reluctant to pay for a repair.

    Another, larger GPU is brought in and connected, but also fails to work – it seems to be incompatible with the aircraft’s system. When turned on it causes a brief flicker of dials in the cockpit, but the “ground power available” light fails to come on. Ricky thinks the fault is to do with the GPU rather than Concorde’s systems, as this did not happen with the other GPU.

    Aluminium pipe also tears in several places, and is repaired with aluminium tape.

    Hydraulic systems

    Ian has brought an adaptor and fits it in readiness for charging the accumulators.

    Museum staff have been unable to supply us with nitrogen, so we have not been able to recharge the accumulators.

    Ian to try obtaining nitrogen from British Airways.

    DV window

    Pete Messum gives Ian the rollers, but Ian needs extra bolts before he can fit them.

    These rollers are not up to flight status.

    Problems identified

    PROBLEM STATUS

    Co-pilot’s curved visor panel shattered. Replacement part obtained.

    Co-pilot’s main windshield cracked. Replacement part obtained, but needs to be taken to GKN for re-glazing.

    Captain’s DV window mechanism broken. Replacement rollers obtained, but bolts and 5/16” nuts needed for fitting them.

    All 4 reheat switches jammed in “on” position. Repair completed.

    Right-hand rear extract fan tripping the circuit breaker. To be done.

    #2, 3, 4 nacelle overheat warning switches set permanently on. To be done.

    Microphone jack panel missing (l/h side, behind jump seat). Noted on previous visit. Jack panel now located – it had been slotted into the space designed for the flight deck door entry panel unit.

    Need to check if this unit was in place on previous visits – look at our photos.

    Jack panel left in place for now, but will need to be restored to its original position.

    New flight deck door entry panel unit needed.

    Oven door handle outside cockpit is broken. Roll pin needed.

    No. 3 TRU switch broken. Needs to be replaced. Ricky has moved it into the “up” position for now.

    Steps for future visits

    New visor panel to be fitted. Cherry picker will be needed; Ricky and Ian to stand on this, while Steve assists from inside the aircraft.

    Plate will need to be removed from standby visor lowering panel.

    DV window to be repaired.

    Nitrogen to be supplied for recharging the accumulators.

    Nitrogen to be supplied for filling tyres and recharging nose oleo.

    Aircraft to be powered up so survey can be conducted for system failures.

    Plates holding the 2 parts of the rudder to be removed before hydraulic systems are activated, so rudder parts are not damaged if the rudder moves.

    **Briefing sheet to be sent to museum in advance of visits, detailing tasks to be carried out and equipment needed. Museum to let us know at least one day in advance if there will be any problems with any item listed.

    Items to be brought for future visits

    Spare ground power protection unit

    Spare flight deck entry panel unit

    Nitrogen (1000 psi)

    Power cable for GPU

    Bolts for fitting rollers to DV window

    Roll pin for oven door

    PROJECT FLAGSHIP: VISIT TO CONCORDE G-BOAC 27 JUNE 2011

    Ricky Bastin, Ross Williamson, Sue Williamson, Steve de Sausmarez, Ian Mosdell, Pete Messum attend a meeting at Concorde G-BOAC to carry out minor repairs. Katie John attends to take notes. Ellie Bastin attends to take photographs for a visual record of the day. Dr David Jones, a friend of Steve de Sausmarez and Katie John, attends briefly as an observer.

    Preparation

    Supply of spare curved visor panel and windshield from Brooklands Museum

    Ross Williamson and Andy from the museum, with Steve de Sausmarez, collected these parts from Brooklands museum on Saturday 25 June.

    The curved visor panel for the co-pilot’s side is intact, but the windshield is cracked. There is some discussion as to how this could have happened, since the windshields never failed in this way while the Concordes were in service. It is suggested that this windshield might have suffered a severe impact.

    Supply of rollers for DV window

    Pete Messum has machined some new rollers for the DV window.

    Supply of aluminium pipe for ground power unit

    Steve de Sausmarez has supplied an extendable aluminium pipe to be fitted to the ground power unit, to prevent the problems encountered on previous visits.

    Plan for the day

    Get power established

    Power up aircraft and conduct survey for system failures

    Recharge accumulators to push hydraulic fluid back into reservoirs

    If enough hydraulic fluid moves back into the tanks, try to get green system working

    Fit new rollers to DV window

    Sequence of events

    Preparing and turning on ground power unit

    Extendable aluminium pipe fitted to GPU, to direct diesel fumes outside building.

    Ground power protection unit located and re-installed.

    GPU is turned on – but fails to work. It is suggested that the head gasket has blown. Andy (museum) thinks the airport, which owns the GPU, will be reluctant to pay for a repair.

    Another, larger GPU is brought in and connected, but also fails to work – it seems to be incompatible with the aircraft’s system. When turned on it causes a brief flicker of dials in the cockpit, but the “ground power available” light fails to come on. Ricky thinks the fault is to do with the GPU rather than Concorde’s systems, as this did not happen with the other GPU.

    Aluminium pipe also tears in several places, and is repaired with aluminium tape.

    Hydraulic systems

    Ian has brought an adaptor and fits it in readiness for charging the accumulators.

    Museum staff have been unable to supply us with nitrogen, so we have not been able to recharge the accumulators.

    Ian to try obtaining nitrogen from British Airways.

    DV window

    Pete Messum gives Ian the rollers, but Ian needs extra bolts before he can fit them.

    These rollers are not up to flight status.

    Problems identified

    PROBLEM STATUS

    Co-pilot’s curved visor panel shattered. Replacement part obtained.

    Co-pilot’s main windshield cracked. Replacement part obtained, but needs to be taken to GKN for re-glazing.

    Captain’s DV window mechanism broken. Replacement rollers obtained, but bolts and 5/16” nuts needed for fitting them.

    All 4 reheat switches jammed in “on” position. Repair completed.

    Right-hand rear extract fan tripping the circuit breaker. To be done.

    #2, 3, 4 nacelle overheat warning switches set permanently on. To be done.

    Microphone jack panel missing (l/h side, behind jump seat). Noted on previous visit. Jack panel now located – it had been slotted into the space designed for the flight deck door entry panel unit.

    Need to check if this unit was in place on previous visits – look at our photos.

    Jack panel left in place for now, but will need to be restored to its original position.

    New flight deck door entry panel unit needed.

    Oven door handle outside cockpit is broken. Roll pin needed.

    No. 3 TRU switch broken. Needs to be replaced. Ricky has moved it into the “up” position for now.

    Steps for future visits

    New visor panel to be fitted. Cherry picker will be needed; Ricky and Ian to stand on this, while Steve assists from inside the aircraft.

    Plate will need to be removed from standby visor lowering panel.

    DV window to be repaired.

    Nitrogen to be supplied for recharging the accumulators.

    Nitrogen to be supplied for filling tyres and recharging nose oleo.

    Aircraft to be powered up so survey can be conducted for system failures.

    Plates holding the 2 parts of the rudder to be removed before hydraulic systems are activated, so rudder parts are not damaged if the rudder moves.

    Briefing sheet to be sent to museum in advance of visits, detailing tasks to be carried out and equipment needed. Museum to let us know at least one day in advance if there will be any problems with any item listed.

    Items to be brought for future visits

    Spare ground power protection unit

    Spare flight deck entry panel unit

    Nitrogen (1000 psi)

    Power cable for GPU

    Bolts for fitting rollers to DV window

    Roll pin for oven door

    PROJECT FLAGSHIP: VISIT TO CONCORDE G-BOAC 04 APRIL 2011

    Ricky Bastin, Ross Williamson, Sue Williamson, Steve de Sausmarez, Ian Mosdell attend a meeting at Concorde G-BOAC to carry out minor repairs. Katie John attends to take notes. Ellie Bastin attends to take photographs for a visual record of the day.

    Plan for the day

    Power up aircraft again to check systems

    Repair DV window

    Sequence of events

    Repair of captain’s DV window

    Ian Mosdell begins work on repair of the captain’s DV window. He notes that some of the rollers in the sliding mechanism are missing. (He suspects that these might have been sent to Brooklands for Concorde G-BBDG.) These will need to be replaced before the window is properly re-fitted.

    Ricky Bastin suggests requesting the necessary parts from British Airways.

    Ian Mosdell suggests having the rollers mde.

    Steve de Sausmarez says his friend at Warwick University can make the rollers.

    Ian Mosdell will temporarily re-fit the window using some rollers from the opposite window to see if it will lock into position.

    Ian fixed window so it is stable for the time being, but will need the following rollers to be made or obtained:

    • 4 x metal rollers for window base: 6mm thick x 20mm outer diameter x 4.8mm inner diameter.

    • 1 x metal roller for window top: 15mm thick x 12mm outer diameter x 8mm inner diameter.

    Setting of valves in readiness for further testing

    Ricky Bastin pushes in refuel valves for all tanks, so the valves are ready to be exercised.

    Pump control valves are left in “out” position.

    Continuous supply valves are pushed in.

    Panel 25-216 (under EXIT sign by right-hand side of flight deck door) – ground power supply. Valves left on (except for vacuum cleaner sockets).

    Air generation supply valve – will have to be cycled so Ricky can find out what is activating the overheat lights.

    Pump valves are left as tripped.

    Ram air turbine circuit breakers are left in “out” position.

    Ricky leaves “out” any valves to do with the windscreen, de-icing, and fuel pumps, but shuts off everything else.

    Start pump breakers set as “out” so Ricky can cycle the start valves.

    Cross-feed valve indicator pushed in.

    Tank 11 blue fuel pump control left as “out”. (Pumps will not be run unless there is fuel in the tanks.)

    SUMMARY:

    • Inlet valves pushed in

    • Refuel valves pushed in

    • Jet valves pushed in

    • Pumps indication valves pushed in

    • Control valve set as “out”.

    Additional points re flight deck

    Water compressors off.

    Racks 12151, 12153, 12155, 12157, 12159 – nothing missing. Transponders still in situ. TCAS processor and MODES still in place.

    Powering aircraft

    Steve de Sausmarez has had a metal fitting made for the GPU so that an exhaust extension pipe can be run outside the hangar. A plastic pipe is fitted.

    GPPU is located and fitted.

    Ground power is turned on twice, but exhaust extension pipe fails both times after a couple of minutes.

    Ricky Bastin is able to ascertain, however, that there are no further faults with the air-conditioning system – the ignition switches are functioning with no problems.

    At the end of the day, GPPU is removed and stowed on rack 6-215, between #1 SSFC computer and GPWC.

    Mending reheat switches

    The team finds that the reheat switches have been broken and the mechanism has been jammed so the switches will not move. The paddles have been stuck with glue.

    Ricky Bastin and Ian Mosdell find that a pair of ordinary wood screws have been wedged into the mechanism to jam it. They remove these so the switches will work again. They remove the glue from the paddles and re-fit them. The switches are now mended.

    Further points

    Ricky Bastin finds the Marilake display unit. He suggests that this can be set up for use in the future.

    Ross Williamson shows Ricky Bastin, Ellie Bastin and Katie John the IFE box containing the Sony Discmans for the in-flight music. (The discs used to be changed every month.) The box is situated on shelf 5-215.

    Ross Williamson has also found the unit holding the recordings for the pre-recorded announcements.

    Peter Carrigan (Flight Engineer 1990–2003, trainer for air crew) attends and joins the team.

    Problems identified

    List of problems recorded in Aircraft Maintenance Log – Technical, pp.AH438201 and 438202.

    PROBLEM STATUS

    Co-pilot’s curved visor panel shattered. Replacement part to be obtained.

    Co-pilot’s main window cracked. Replacement part to be obtained.

    Captain’s DV window mechanism broken. Repair ongoing; replacement rollers to be obtained.

    All 4 reheat switches jammed in “on” position. Repair completed.

    Right-hand rear extract fan tripping the circuit breaker. To be done.

    #2, 3, 4 nacelle overheat warning switches set permanently on. To be done.

    Jack panel missing (l/h side, behind jump seat). Replacement to be obtained.

    PROJECT FLAGSHIP: VISIT TO CONCORDE G-BOAC 08 AUGUST 2011

    Ricky Bastin, Ross Williamson, Sue Williamson, Peter Messum, Steve de Sausmarez attend a meeting at Concorde G-BOAC to carry out repairs. Katie John attends to assist and take notes. Ellie Bastin attends to take photographs for a visual record of the day.

    Ian Mosdell was unable to attend.

    Natalie Kelly, manager of the Runway Visitors’ Park, and Paul Emblow attend with colleagues to view the work.

    Preparation

    Supply of power lead for ground power unit

    Ian Kirby liaising with Powervamp Group to obtain a 50m cable for the GPU. Ongoing.

    New ground power unit (Runway Visitors’ Park)

    Ground power unit (Houchin GPU16) loaned by Swissport, Manchester Airport.

    Nitrogen bottles

    Two nitrogen bottles (3000 psi) supplied by Air Products, Manchester Airport.

    Rig for nitrogen bottles

    Charging unit for landing gear loaned by Brooklands museum.

    Tyre inflator and tyre pressure gauge

    Ricky Bastin brought these items. British Airways has donated them to the museum.

    Repair of windshield

    Windshield is now with GKN. Steve de Sausmarez has been in contact with them. They first need to remove the shattered glass before fitting the new glass. GKN contact told Steve that the glass had been shattered by a single-point impact (e.g. from several hammer blows).

    Plan for the day

    Charge accumulators for the 3 hydraulic systems plus the brakes

    Re-fill tyres and nose oleo with nitrogen

    Put power on the aircraft and check systems

    Attempt movement of nose and visor

    Sequence of events

    Ross Williamson reports that he has repaired the handle on the oven door.

    JOB COMPLETED.

    Filling of accumulators

    Ricky Bastin connects nitrogen bottle and Turner gauge to accumulator for Blue system. Ricky notes that once the accumulators have been fully charged, they will only need to be re-charged about once every 6 months.

    Steve de Sausmarez goes on to flight deck, then reports that dial for Green system is showing that system is partially full.

    Peter Messum connects nitrogen bottle to brake accumulator, then Ricky charges this accumulator.

    Ricky Bastin then fills accumulators for the other two hydraulic systems.

    Once all four systems are charged, Ricky reports their status as follows:

    • Green system has just under 4 gallons

    • Blue system has “a bit”

    • Yellow system is “pretty empty”.

    Ricky notes that we will need to obtain some more fluid to top up the systems.

    Discussion with Natalie Kelly

    Team breaks for lunch and is joined by Natalie Kelly. Ricky Bastin explains to Natalie what team has done so far and what still needs to be done to complete the repair work.

    To publicise the completion of the repair, Ricky outlines two options: to invite the media in to view the replacement of the windshield, or to wait until after completion and hold a special event then. The team feels that it would be better to wait until the repair is completed before holding any publicity event. We can use the film footage taken by Ellie Bastin to help generate publicity.

    Ellie Bastin has been appointed Media Director for the team. She suggests meeting with Natalie to plan the publicity for the project, and bringing a visual time line of her photographs. Natallie wants to create a display featuring the repair work, with display boards.

    Ricky Bastin tells Natalie that we need two 28-volt aircraft batteries so that the main flight instruments will work. Natalie offers to e-mail some engineers at the airport to ask for these.

    Operation of GPU

    GPU is compatible with the aircraft, but team has to rig up piping to draw the exhaust out of the hangar. This work takes around two hours. Steve de Sausmarez has supplied several lengths of robust aluminium piping, which are then joined together with tape, but the pipe breaks repeatedly and the GPU has to be turned off each time.

    However, the aircraft systems work with no problem each time the GPU is turned on.

    The issue with the exhaust will have to be remedied before the next visit.

    Peter Messum says that there are extractor machines that are used on lorries in loading bays, to draw exhaust out of the bay. He suggests that we can use a machine like this to draw fumes from the GPU out of the hangar. The machine would need a 3-phase 440-volt power supply, but Peter says that the generator just behind the hangar would be able to supply this. The machine would need a long power cable. It would be necessary to use a GPU with a round exhaust, to fit the extractor machine.

    Powering up aircraft

    Ricky Bastin goes on to flight deck to power up aircraft. He finds that the dials for the hydraulic systems show that some of the hydraulic fluid from the reservoir has been “lost” in the system, but he estimates that there should still be sufficient fluid in Green system to move the nose.

    Natalie Kelly goes up on to flight deck and Ricky demonstrates a power-up for her.

    Ricky reports that:

    • One of the engine computers is not working.

    • The air data computers work.

    • The fly-by-wire computer works.

    • 2 of the intake lanes are not working (1A and 1B).

    • Right-hand rear extractor fan keeps tripping circuit breaker, as before. Ricky says we will need to lift floor above the fan and examine it, to see whether it is just dirty or whether it will need to be replaced.

    • He has re-set the brake overload indicator so this no longer comes on.

    Ricky estimates that he will need at least one hour of power from GPU in order to check and exercise all the systems.

    Filling tyres

    Work starts with main wheels on port side. Ricky fits nitrogen bottle and landing gear charging unit to inner rear tyre. He partially inflates tyre but finds that valve is leaking. He adds more nitrogen and finds that the leak stops. The tyre is filled to 170psi.

    The inner front tyre is filled to 200psi.

    Ricky fills tyres slowly, to avoid putting too much stress on the tyre structure. He states that we will partially inflate the tyres now, and inflate them further on a future visit.

    Ricky Bastin and Katie John note that the screens around the landing gear will need to be taken down in advance of the visit, so work can begin immediately.

    Ricky measures the pressure in the outer rear tyre, left landing gear, and finds it to be 30psi. He inflates the tyre to 200psi.

    Ross Williamson suggests using an axle stand to take the pressure off the tyres. Katie John suggests using the stand for brief periods to enable the tyres to be turned. Ricky Bastin says it is OK for the aircraft to stand on the tyres but they just need to be re-inflated every month.

    Ricky fills the outer front tyre to 200psi.

    Ricky says we need 10 x nipple covers for the tyre valves.

    Ricky Bastin, Katie John and Ross Williamson move equipment to starboard landing gear. Ricky measures pressure in right outer tyre and finds it to be 60psi. He fills the tyre to 170psi, then nitrogen is exhausted.

    Ricky estimates that a further 2 bottles of nitrogen will be needed to fill the remaining 3 tyres. He also says we will need extra nitrogen for the nose oleo.

    Ricky says to Ross that the Runway Visitors’ Park needs their own nitrogen landing gear charging unit. He suggests renting a unit from Swissport.

    Problems identified 08/08/2011

    PROBLEM STATUS

    Co-pilot’s curved visor panel shattered. Shattered panel removed.

    Replacement curved visor panel fitted.

    Repair completed 18/07/2011.

    Co-pilot’s main windshield cracked. Replacement part taken to GKN for re-glazing. Ongoing.

    Captain’s DV window mechanism broken. Replacement rollers obtained, but bolts and 5/16” nuts needed for fitting them. Ongoing.

    Bolts had to be drilled out on inboard glazing strip for curved visor panel. 4 bolts to be supplied (Boeing type?).

    Aft bolt stub needs to be drilled out. To be done.

    Braces immobilising rudder to be removed before filling of hydraulic system. Repair completed 18/07/2011.

    Main landing gear tyres to be re-filled with nitrogen. To be done.

    Nose oleo to be re-filled with nitrogen.

    All 4 reheat switches jammed in “on” position. Repair completed 14/03/2011.

    Right-hand rear extract fan tripping the circuit breaker. To be done.

    #2, 3, 4 nacelle overheat warning switches set permanently on. To be done.

    Microphone jack panel missing (l/h side, behind jump seat). Jack panel removed from the space designed for the flight deck door entry panel unit, and re-fitted in its correct place.

    Repair completed 18/07/2011.

    Flight deck door entry panel unit missing. New unit supplied and fitted.

    Repair completed 18/07/2011.

    Oven door handle outside cockpit is broken. New roll pin fitted.

    Repair completed 08/08/2011.

    No. 3 TRU switch broken. Needs to be replaced. Ricky has moved it into the “up” position for now. Ongoing.

    Two bulbs gone in forward galley. To be replaced.

    Steps for next visit

    Nitrogen to be supplied for further filling of tyres and recharging of nose oleo.

    Aircraft to be powered up again so survey can be conducted for system failures.

    Extra hydraulic fluid to be added to systems – either M2V or military equivalent. As much fluid as possible will be transferred to Green system so that the nose can be lowered. We will need 5–6 gallons. Ricky Bastin to investigate collecting fluid from another Concorde. Steve de Sausmarez will ask Ian Kirby to order some of the military equivalent fluid that he has already had tested.

    Ricky Bastin will try again to find out if his contacts in New York still have a hydraulic gun available. He will also ask for an engine oil gun.

    DV window to be repaired.

    Steve de Sausmarez to work with Peter Messum on organising a suitable exhaust system for the GPU.

    Once hydraulic systems topped up, nose and visor mechanism to be tested.

    Steps for following visit

    Replace the cracked windshield.

    Contact Museum of Flight, East Fortune, to ask if we can collect some spare parts from G-BOAA (e.g. Graviner box).

    Items to be brought for future visits

    • Spare ground power unit to be borrowed again

    • Power cable for GPU

    • Additional hydraulic fluid – either M2V or military equivalent

    • Hydraulic gun for filling reservoirs

    • Engine oil gun

    • Nitrogen (3000 psi) – at least 3 more bottles

    • 5/16” bolts for fitting rollers to DV window

    • 4 bolts for curved visor panel (inboard glazing strip)

    • 2 x 28-volt lead acid aircraft batteries (eg from Boeing 737) to fix nacelle overheats x 3

    • Replacement reheat switches

    • New light to be fitted under nose

    • Spare roll pins for oven doors

    • 10 x nipple covers for tyre valves

    • Extra ground power protection unit as spare – perhaps from East Fortune?

    • Extra fire detection box (FFFD/ Graviner box)

    PROJECT FLAGSHIP: VISIT TO CONCORDE G-BOAC 18 JULY 2011

    Ricky Bastin, Ross Williamson, Sue Williamson, Steve de Sausmarez, Ian Mosdell attend a meeting at Concorde G-BOAC to carry out repairs. Katie John attends to take notes. Ellie Bastin attends to take photographs for a visual record of the day.

    Natalie Kelly, manager of the Runway Visitors’ Park, attends to view the work and holds a meeting with Ricky Bastin and Steve de Sausmarez.

    Preparation

    Curved visor panel from Brooklands Museum

    Visor panel brought out ready for fitting.

    Supply of replacement cockpit door control panel

    Ricky Bastin has brought a replacement for this unit.

    Supply of power lead for ground power unit

    Ian Kirby liaising with Powervamp Group to obtain a 50m cable for the GPU. Ongoing.

    Repair of ground power unit (Runway Visitors’ Park)

    Ross Williamson has been asking Andrew Gunther whether and when the GPU will be repaired, but so far has had no answer.

    Ross also asked Andrew for a supply of nitrogen.

    Plan for the day

    Re-fit control panel for cockpit door

    Replace shattered visor panel (co-pilot’s side)

    Re-fill tyres with nitrogen

    No 3 BTB switch to be replaced at a later date.

    Sequence of events

    Assessment of damaged curved visor panel

    Ian Mosdell and Katie John go up in scissor lift to view the damaged panel at close quarters. The previous caretaker for G-BOAC had tried to drill out some of the titanium screws holding the glazed side panel, so that he could open the side panel, reach inside the visor and clean away condensation. The drill bit had slipped and hit the glazed panel, shattering it completely. The caretaker had tried to drill the bolts out sideways and made extra holes in the frame.

    The damage to the co-pilot’s windshield is also visible; the windshield has been cracked from the inside.

    Ellie and Ricky Bastin go up in scissor lift with Steve de Sausmarez to view the damaged visor panel. Ellie Bastin photographs the damaged visor and windshield.

    Ellie Bastin also photographs replacement panel in its box, and photographs replacement cockpit door control unit.

    Ricky Bastin and Ian Mosdell discuss detail of repair procedure.

    Meeting with Natalie Kelly, RVP manager

    Steve de Sausmarez and Ricky Bastin meet with Natalie Kelly to discuss the repairs to G-BOAC. Natalie states that she supports the continuation of this project.

    Assessment of tyres

    Ian Mosdell and Ross Williamson examine the tyres on the main landing gear. They note excessively low tyre pressure, particularly on the port side. Ian Mosdell states his concern that the structure of the tyre will start to fail if the tyre is not re-inflated. He has with him an adaptor that he can use for fitting to the nitrogen canisters and filling the tyres.

    Supply of nitrogen for tyres

    Andrew Gunther tells Katie John that British Airways engineers at Manchester are ringing apron control to get the nitrogen to us. However, the vehicle bringing it cannot travel on the public highway. Runway Visitors’ Park has a towing vehicle, but its tow bar will not work with that of the vehicle with the nitrogen. In addition, this vehicle is also unable to travel on the public highway.

    Apron Control state to Andrew Gunther that they will under no circumstances allocate a vehicle to accompany the nitrogen to the Visitors’ Park.

    John Hepple has a vehicle with a suitable tow bar, but the vehicle’s brakes are not safe for this task.

    Ross Williamson later reports that nitrogen is on its way to the airport, supplied by the outside company that inflated G-BOAC’s tyres the last time (Storm Aviation). This company already has an attachment that will enable it to fill the tyres. There will, however, be a charge for the nitrogen; last time, the cost was £500. The nitrogen should arrive between 2.00 and 3.00pm.

    Perspex shields removed from around the port landing gear in preparation for the tyres to be filled.

    At 3.40pm the nitrogen still has not arrived. Andrew Gunther has gone home by this point.

    Natalie Kelly is briefed on the situation, and makes several attempts to obtain nitrogen from the outside company and other sources. However, she is told that nobody will be able to supply the nitrogen today.

    Sue Williamson rings Andrew Gunther. Andrew tells her that he made further attempts to get the nitrogen from the airport, but the sticking point was Airport Operations, who refused to send an escort vehicle with the nitrogen.

    Natalie Kelly says that the RVP can obtain nitrogen in the next couple of days. She will have it stored behind the hangar, so we will have it for next time. (RVP will have to pay for the nitrogen.)

    Status of Ground Power Unit

    Andrew Gunther tells Katie John that Motor Transport will conduct an exploratory examination of the GPU. Natalie Kelly has authorised £500 for the repair of the unit. (If the repair is likely to cost more than this, MT will notify Andrew.)

    Andrew Gunther says that if the head is cracked, the GPU will be inoperable. It is the only unit of its type at Manchester Airport.

    Replacement of cockpit door control unit

    Ross Williamson fits the cockpit door control unit into its correct place. He removes the microphone jack unit that had been occupying the space and fits this back into its correct position.

    JOB COMPLETED.

    Ross also points out damaged screens on TCAS units.

    Removal of damaged visor panel

    Ian Mosdell starts removing the bolts from the visor frame, starting with the side panel. He is assisted by Ricky Bastin and Steve de Sausmarez.

    They open the side panel, then unbolt and remove the frame and glass.

    They remove the bolts from the frame surrounding the damaged visor panel, and loosen the bolts on the inboard glazing strip. They drill out some of the bolts.

    Finally, they remove the damaged visor panel and remove the rubber seal from around it. This panel will be taken to GKN for repair.

    Fitting of new curved visor panel

    Ian Mosdell, Ricky Bastin and Steve de Sausmarez fit the rubber seal around the new panel. They loosen some more bolts in the frame, and then fit the new panel in place.

    They replace the frame and the side panel.

    JOB COMPLETED.

    We will need to supply and fit 4 new bolts. Ian Mosdell says he can use bolts for Boeing aircraft.

    The side panel will need to be secured before the nose is operated.

    Removal of braces immobilising rudder

    Ian Mosdell had said that the braces would have to be removed before the hydraulic system was activated, in case this caused the rudder to move. Ian and Steve de Sausmarez go up in the scissor lift, remove the braces and push the rudder straight.

    JOB COMPLETED.

    Problems identified 18/7/2011

    PROBLEM STATUS

    Co-pilot’s curved visor panel shattered. Shattered panel removed.

    Replacement curved visor panel fitted.

    Repair completed.

    Co-pilot’s main windshield cracked. Replacement part obtained, but needs to be taken to GKN for re-glazing. Ongoing.

    Captain’s DV window mechanism broken. Replacement rollers obtained, but bolts and 5/16” nuts needed for fitting them. Ongoing.

    Bolts had to be drilled out on inboard glazing strip for curved visor panel. 4 bolts to be supplied (Boeing type?).

    Aft bolt stub needs to be drilled out. To be done.

    Braces immobilising rudder to be removed before filling of hydraulic system. Repair completed.

    Main landing gear tyres and nose oleo to be re-filled with nitrogen. To be done.

    All 4 reheat switches jammed in “on” position. Repair completed.

    Right-hand rear extract fan tripping the circuit breaker. To be done.

    #2, 3, 4 nacelle overheat warning switches set permanently on. To be done.

    Microphone jack panel missing (l/h side, behind jump seat). Jack panel removed from the space designed for the flight deck door entry panel unit, and re-fitted in its correct place.

    Repair completed.

    Flight deck door entry panel unit missing. New unit supplied and fitted.

    Repair completed.

    Oven door handle outside cockpit is broken. Roll pin needed.

    New roll pin supplied, but needs to be fitted. Ongoing.

    No. 3 TRU switch broken. Needs to be replaced. Ricky has moved it into the “up” position for now. Ongoing.

    Two bulbs gone in forward galley. To be replaced.

    Steps for next visit

    Nitrogen to be supplied for recharging the accumulators.

    Nitrogen to be supplied for filling tyres and recharging nose oleo.

    Aircraft to be powered up so survey can be conducted for system failures.

    Contents of hydraulic system to be assessed once the accumulators have been recharged. If there is enough fluid for activation to be viable, as much fluid as possible will be transferred to Green system so that the nose can be lowered. (We will need 3.5–4 gallons.)

    DV window to be repaired.

    Ricky Bastin said he would show Ross Williamson how to power up the electrical systems so Ross could do this once a week.

    Steps for following visit

    Replace the cracked windshield.

    Items to be brought for future visits

    Spare ground power protection unit

    Nitrogen (1000 psi)

    Power cable for GPU

    5/16” bolts for fitting rollers to DV window

    4 bolts for curved visor panel (inboard glazing strip)

    PROJECT FLAGSHIP: VISIT TO CONCORDE G-BOAC 18 JULY 2011

    Ricky Bastin, Ross Williamson, Sue Williamson, Steve de Sausmarez, Ian Mosdell attend a meeting at Concorde G-BOAC to carry out repairs. Katie John attends to take notes. Ellie Bastin attends to take photographs for a visual record of the day.

    Natalie Kelly, manager of the Runway Visitors’ Park, attends to view the work and holds a meeting with Ricky Bastin and Steve de Sausmarez.

    Preparation

    Curved visor panel from Brooklands Museum

    Visor panel brought out ready for fitting.

    Supply of replacement cockpit door control panel

    Ricky Bastin has brought a replacement for this unit.

    Supply of power lead for ground power unit

    Ian Kirby liaising with Powervamp Group to obtain a 50m cable for the GPU. Ongoing.

    Repair of ground power unit (Runway Visitors’ Park)

    Ross Williamson has been asking Andrew Gunther whether and when the GPU will be repaired, but so far has had no answer.

    Ross also asked Andrew for a supply of nitrogen.

    Plan for the day

    Re-fit control panel for cockpit door

    Replace shattered visor panel (co-pilot’s side)

    Re-fill tyres with nitrogen

    No 3 BTB switch to be replaced at a later date.

    Sequence of events

    Assessment of damaged curved visor panel

    Ian Mosdell and Katie John go up in scissor lift to view the damaged panel at close quarters. The previous caretaker for G-BOAC had tried to drill out some of the titanium screws holding the glazed side panel, so that he could open the side panel, reach inside the visor and clean away condensation. The drill bit had slipped and hit the glazed panel, shattering it completely. The caretaker had tried to drill the bolts out sideways and made extra holes in the frame.

    The damage to the co-pilot’s windshield is also visible; the windshield has been cracked from the inside.

    Ellie and Ricky Bastin go up in scissor lift with Steve de Sausmarez to view the damaged visor panel. Ellie Bastin photographs the damaged visor and windshield.

    Ellie Bastin also photographs replacement panel in its box, and photographs replacement cockpit door control unit.

    Ricky Bastin and Ian Mosdell discuss detail of repair procedure.

    Meeting with Natalie Kelly, RVP manager

    Steve de Sausmarez and Ricky Bastin meet with Natalie Kelly to discuss the repairs to G-BOAC. Natalie states that she supports the continuation of this project.

    Assessment of tyres

    Ian Mosdell and Ross Williamson examine the tyres on the main landing gear. They note excessively low tyre pressure, particularly on the port side. Ian Mosdell states his concern that the structure of the tyre will start to fail if the tyre is not re-inflated. He has with him an adaptor that he can use for fitting to the nitrogen canisters and filling the tyres.

    Supply of nitrogen for tyres

    Andrew Gunther tells Katie John that British Airways engineers at Manchester are ringing apron control to get the nitrogen to us. However, the vehicle bringing it cannot travel on the public highway. Runway Visitors’ Park has a towing vehicle, but its tow bar will not work with that of the vehicle with the nitrogen. In addition, this vehicle is also unable to travel on the public highway.

    Apron Control state to Andrew Gunther that they will under no circumstances allocate a vehicle to accompany the nitrogen to the Visitors’ Park.

    John Hepple has a vehicle with a suitable tow bar, but the vehicle’s brakes are not safe for this task.

    Ross Williamson later reports that nitrogen is on its way to the airport, supplied by the outside company that inflated G-BOAC’s tyres the last time (Storm Aviation). This company already has an attachment that will enable it to fill the tyres. There will, however, be a charge for the nitrogen; last time, the cost was £500. The nitrogen should arrive between 2.00 and 3.00pm.

    Perspex shields removed from around the port landing gear in preparation for the tyres to be filled.

    At 3.40pm the nitrogen still has not arrived. Andrew Gunther has gone home by this point.

    Natalie Kelly is briefed on the situation, and makes several attempts to obtain nitrogen from the outside company and other sources. However, she is told that nobody will be able to supply the nitrogen today.

    Sue Williamson rings Andrew Gunther. Andrew tells her that he made further attempts to get the nitrogen from the airport, but the sticking point was Airport Operations, who refused to send an escort vehicle with the nitrogen.

    Natalie Kelly says that the RVP can obtain nitrogen in the next couple of days. She will have it stored behind the hangar, so we will have it for next time. (RVP will have to pay for the nitrogen.)

    Status of Ground Power Unit

    Andrew Gunther tells Katie John that Motor Transport will conduct an exploratory examination of the GPU. Natalie Kelly has authorised £500 for the repair of the unit. (If the repair is likely to cost more than this, MT will notify Andrew.)

    Andrew Gunther says that if the head is cracked, the GPU will be inoperable. It is the only unit of its type at Manchester Airport.

    Replacement of cockpit door control unit

    Ross Williamson fits the cockpit door control unit into its correct place. He removes the microphone jack unit that had been occupying the space and fits this back into its correct position.

    JOB COMPLETED.

    Ross also points out damaged screens on TCAS units.

    Removal of damaged visor panel

    Ian Mosdell starts removing the bolts from the visor frame, starting with the side panel. He is assisted by Ricky Bastin and Steve de Sausmarez.

    They open the side panel, then unbolt and remove the frame and glass.

    They remove the bolts from the frame surrounding the damaged visor panel, and loosen the bolts on the inboard glazing strip. They drill out some of the bolts.

    Finally, they remove the damaged visor panel and remove the rubber seal from around it. This panel will be taken to GKN for repair.

    Fitting of new curved visor panel

    Ian Mosdell, Ricky Bastin and Steve de Sausmarez fit the rubber seal around the new panel. They loosen some more bolts in the frame, and then fit the new panel in place.

    They replace the frame and the side panel.

    JOB COMPLETED.

    We will need to supply and fit 4 new bolts. Ian Mosdell says he can use bolts for Boeing aircraft.

    The side panel will need to be secured before the nose is operated.

    Removal of braces immobilising rudder

    Ian Mosdell had said that the braces would have to be removed before the hydraulic system was activated, in case this caused the rudder to move. Ian and Steve de Sausmarez go up in the scissor lift, remove the braces and push the rudder straight.

    JOB COMPLETED.

    Problems identified 18/7/2011

    PROBLEM STATUS

    Co-pilot’s curved visor panel shattered. Shattered panel removed.

    Replacement curved visor panel fitted.

    Repair completed.

    Co-pilot’s main windshield cracked. Replacement part obtained, but needs to be taken to GKN for re-glazing. Ongoing.

    Captain’s DV window mechanism broken. Replacement rollers obtained, but bolts and 5/16” nuts needed for fitting them. Ongoing.

    Bolts had to be drilled out on inboard glazing strip for curved visor panel. 4 bolts to be supplied (Boeing type?).

    Aft bolt stub needs to be drilled out. To be done.

    Braces immobilising rudder to be removed before filling of hydraulic system. Repair completed.

    Main landing gear tyres and nose oleo to be re-filled with nitrogen. To be done.

    All 4 reheat switches jammed in “on” position. Repair completed.

    Right-hand rear extract fan tripping the circuit breaker. To be done.

    #2, 3, 4 nacelle overheat warning switches set permanently on. To be done.

    Microphone jack panel missing (l/h side, behind jump seat). Jack panel removed from the space designed for the flight deck door entry panel unit, and re-fitted in its correct place.

    Repair completed.

    Flight deck door entry panel unit missing. New unit supplied and fitted.

    Repair completed.

    Oven door handle outside cockpit is broken. Roll pin needed.

    New roll pin supplied, but needs to be fitted. Ongoing.

    No. 3 TRU switch broken. Needs to be replaced. Ricky has moved it into the “up” position for now. Ongoing.

    Two bulbs gone in forward galley. To be replaced.

    Steps for next visit

    Nitrogen to be supplied for recharging the accumulators.

    Nitrogen to be supplied for filling tyres and recharging nose oleo.

    Aircraft to be powered up so survey can be conducted for system failures.

    Contents of hydraulic system to be assessed once the accumulators have been recharged. If there is enough fluid for activation to be viable, as much fluid as possible will be transferred to Green system so that the nose can be lowered. (We will need 3.5–4 gallons.)

    DV window to be repaired.

    Ricky Bastin said he would show Ross Williamson how to power up the electrical systems so Ross could do this once a week.

    Steps for following visit

    Replace the cracked windshield.

    Items to be brought for future visits

    Spare ground power protection unit

    Nitrogen (1000 psi)

    Power cable for GPU

    5/16” bolts for fitting rollers to DV window

    4 bolts for curved visor panel (inboard glazing strip)

    PROJECT FLAGSHIP: VISIT TO CONCORDE G-BOAC 26 AUGUST 2011

    Ricky Bastin, Ian Mosdell, Ross Williamson, Sue Williamson, Steve de Sausmarez attend a meeting at Concorde G-BOAC to carry out repairs. Katie John attends to assist and take notes. Ellie Bastin attends to take photographs for a visual record of the day.

    Preparation

    Supply of exhaust extractor system for ground power unit

    Peter Messum and Steve de Sausmarez have constructed a system of stainless steel and rubber piping to direct the exhaust from the GPU out of the hangar. Peter Messum has also brought an exhaust extractor used for lorries, to help draw the fumes away. Airport Operations at Manchester Airport has supplied an extension lead for the exhaust extractor.

    The extension lead was the wrong size for the extractor, and was 32 amps instead of 16 amps; Natalie Kelly obtained a lead of the correct size during the course of the day.

    New ground power unit (Runway Visitors’ Park)

    Ground power unit (Houchin GPU18) loaned by Swissport, Manchester Airport.

    Hydraulic fluid

    Steve de Sausmarez located a supplier of MIL-PRF-87257B hydraulic fluid – trade name Castrol Brayco Micronic 881. Ian Kirby has already had tests conducted on this type of fluid and has established that it will be compatible with Concorde’s M2V fluid.

    Natalie Kelly ordered 5 US gallons of this fluid. Steve de Sausmarez collected the fluid from the suppliers in Harrow on Thursday 25 August.

    Hydraulic gun

    Ricky Bastin and Ian Mosdell have adapted a hydraulic gun for the Boeing 747 so that we can use it for Concorde.

    Repair of windshield

    Windshield is with GKN. Repair ongoing.

    Supply of power lead for ground power unit

    Ian Kirby liaising with Powervamp Group to obtain a 50m cable for the GPU. Ongoing.

    Roll pins for oven door handles

    Ian Mosdell supplied museum with spare roll pins for the oven door handles.

    Plan for the day

    Fill Green tank with hydraulic fluid

    Fit 2 temporary jumper wires in electronics racking for INS

    Put power on the aircraft and check systems

    Attempt movement of nose and visor

    Update Tech Log

    Sequence of events

    Filling of Green tank

    Ricky Bastin and Ian Mosdell find a small M2V drip at the base of the left-hand engine bay.

    Ian Mosdell, Ricky Bastin, Steve de Sausmarez, and Peter Messum pump Castrol hydraulic fluid into Green system reservoir. Reservoir is filled, then some excess dribbles out of fuselage. As much of the excess as possible is caught in a container.

    Readying of INS

    Ricky Bastin and Steve de Sausmarez go on to flight deck and open racks.

    Ricky fits wire links to enable INS 1 and 2 to be powered up, so main flight instruments will be powered up.

    Ricky first fixes a length of 20-gauge wire to terminal for INS 1 (Battery A). Ricky then removes cover over bus bars, and connects other end of wire to main DC bus bar no.2 (Bus 2P).

    Ricky drops screw for Bus 2P, so borrows one from TAR circuit, 5 point in from right (2K). Ricky clips off end of wire for 2K and secures the free end of the wire with cable tie.

    Terminal for INS 2 (Bat B) is located on same side as terminal for INS 1. No. 2 still to be actioned and some INS CDU spare digit filaments are required from donor aircraft.

    Preparation of hydraulic pumps

    Ian Mosdell comes on to flight deck and closes shut-off valves for all engine hydraulic pumps.

    Powering up aircraft

    GPU (Houchin 18) arrives just after 12.00pm.

    GPU is powered up and ground power is turned on on aircraft.

    Hydraulic fluid reservoirs are pressurised for the first time since 2003.

    • Dial for Green tank shows just under 2 US gallons.

    • Dial for Yellow tank shows 0 US gallons.

    • “Low level” light is on for all 3 systems, and “Low pressure” light is on for Blue system.

    Air compressor is activated.

    Initial checks of systems

    • INERTIAL NAVIGATION SYSTEM

    Ricky Bastin switches on INS and reads off last co-ordinates registered by G-BOAC when she landed at Manchester Airport in 2003:

    Longitude 3.20.2 Latitude 2.12.9

    Ellie Bastin finds co-ordinates of Manchester Airport on iPhone:

    50°21’14”N 2°16’30”W

    Ricky programs these co-ordinates into INS.

    • BRAKE FANS

    Ricky tests brake fans briefly. All 8 fans work. Ricky plans to re-test these later.

    Further filling of hydraulic fluid tank

    Aircraft is powered down. More hydraulic fluid is added to Green tank.

    Readings on tanks: 5.5 US gallons; 6.5 US gallons; 3.5 US gallons. This is correct, but due to broken depressurisation valve on BLUE tank, tanks cannot be fully pressurised and therefore BLUE and YELLOW readings are suspect. We suspect in fact that these systems are for all purposes empty.

    Level in Green tank is found to have dropped from 7 US gallons to 3 US gallons. Ricky checks this a little later, and finds that 4 US gallons of fluid have been transferred back in.

    Ian Mosdell and Ricky Bastin fill Green tank with the rest of the Castrol hydraulic fluid.

    Aircraft is powered up again. On flight deck, level of fluid in Green tank is shown as 3 US gallons. Level drops to 2.75 gallons, but does not fall any further. Level is above the minimum.

    Ian Mosdell comes onto flight deck and says there was a “little screech” from the Blue tank/pump side. I tweaked the BLUE/YELLOW pump to “on” briefly – RB.

    Ricky starts transferring fluid into flying controls.

    Ian suggests pushing up elevons manually to push more fluid into the system.

    Ricky switches on ground hydraulic pump 1 (G/Y). Meanwhile, Ian moves elevons manually. A few minutes later, Ricky switches the pump off.

    Ian Mosdell and Steve de Sausmarez drain Blue and Yellow tanks to fill Green. Ian later says they got a small amount of fluid out of Yellow and nothing out of Blue.

    3.11pm – hydraulic fluid level gauges on flight deck are checked again.

    • Level in Green is steady at 2.75 US gallons.

    • Yellow is up to 4.4 US gallons, with “low pressure” light on.

    • Blue is at 0 US gallons, with both “low pressure” and “low level” lights on.

    3.17pm – level shown for Yellow falls to less than 1 US gallon.

    Ian Mosdell suggests cracking the hydraulic line to the pumps to release some air.

    3.27pm – Yellow tank gauge reads 0 US gallons. Ricky says that he and Ian have drained a lot of air out of the hydraulic fluid tanks.

    Ricky switches on ground hydraulic pump no. 1 briefly – there is a tiny kick but no other reaction.

    Ricky turns hydraulic system selector dial, but this has no effect on the tank levels.

    Ian returns to flight deck and says he thinks ground hydraulic pump no. 1 is inoperable.

    Ian says we need a depressurisation valve for blue system. Air release valve on Blue system broke while Ian was depressurising the system. We need a replacement (from Alpha Bravo or Alpha Alpha?) otherwise we cannot fully pressurise the system.

    At hydraulic access area, Ian Mosdell and Ricky Bastin drain Blue system. They get a couple of pints out of the system, which are mixed with the last of the Castrol fluid.

    Ian bleeds some more air out of the system.

    Ian says the bellows in one of the reservoirs might have a hole in it.

    Ian has drained the de-aeration valves; he says they were full of oil.

    Green tank now has 5 US gallons in it. Ian pumps the remainder of the mixed fluid into this tank.

    Ian confirms that ground hydraulic pump no. 1 is not working. He says that it does not turn off properly but just winds down. He says this can be swapped with no. 2 pump, but it will be a long job. Will need to do this on the next visit. Ian says we first need to know whether pumps for Blue and Green systems are interchangeable.

    Ian offers to come back with one other engineer to carry out this task. Steve de Sausmarez offers to come with him to assist. Ian aims to return before 20 September.

    Further checks on systems

    • AIR CONDITIONING

    Ricky Bastin finds a problem with the Group 3 circuit breaker so leaves it out.

    • THROTTLE MASTER SWITCHES

    Ricky activates throttle lanes. He finds failure of 3 main throttle master.

    • FLYING CONTROL INSTRUMENTS

    Ricky activates relay jack, then auto stab 1 and 2, artificial feel 1 and 2, and electric trim.

    • P7 TRANSMITTER

    No 4 P7 transmitter dial is flickering, with a reading of 0.2 to 0.3 psi. Confirmed transmitter fault and not gauge – RB.

    • PRIMARY ENGINE INSTRUMENT GAUGES

    All gauges for engine instruments working OK: N2 (high) and N1 (low) pressure gauges, fuel flow, exhaust gas temperature, primary nozzle.

    Ricky activates the 4 fuel flow gauges – the gauges perform a self-test.

    • RADIO

    Ricky tries a headset that he has brought with him, to see if the radio works. He tries the radio at the co-pilot’s station, but this is dead. He tries the flight engineer’s station, and this is live.

    Later, Ross Williamson hears his son over the radio, broadcasting from the flight deck of a Thompson aircraft!

    • PA SYSTEM

    Ricky tries a PA test to the cabin, but there is no transmission. He tries the tests again, using the transmitter in the flight engineer’s oxygen mask, and this works. Boeing headset microphone jack plugs to be modified for Concorde.

    • TYRE BURST/FLAT DETECTOR

    Ricky tests the tyre burst/flat detector – this is OK.

    • EXTERNAL LIGHTS

    Ricky turns off main landing lights and taxi lights, to prevent them from over-heating. Turns them back on briefly so they can be photographed.

    • ENGINE START VALVES

    Ricky finds that all of the start valves are working.

    Fluctuations in instrument readings

    • PRIMARY ENGINE INSTRUMENT GAUGES

    N1 dial no. 1 appears stuck at 10% rpm. N2 dial no 3 has numbers flickering for a few minutes, then stops at 0.9-1.0% rpm This is a minor gauge fault.

    • RADIOMAGNETIC INDICATORS

    RMIs on both captain’s and co-pilot’s side show slight flickering of needles. This is normal

    • EQUIPMENT BAY COOLING LIGHT

    “Flow” light flickers for a while, but settles down. Ian Mosdell later says he thinks the light might be flickering due to a faulty extractor fan. The R/H rear extract fan is blowing circuit breaker. Same breaker feeds the light.

    • ELECTRICS

    AC main bus 2 and AC ess bus 4 are both reading 50 TRU amps.

    • RADIATION GAUGE

    Millirems dial (bottom left by flight engineer’s seat) flickers up to 0.2. Ricky says this is registering background radiation.

    • STANDBY ARTIFICIAL HORIZON

    3.58pm – after power is turned off on aircraft, this instrument spins rapidly for about 10 minutes, before slowing and stopping. Ricky Bastin says later that this instrument can be stopped manually. This is normal behaviour, can be stopped by pulling caging knob on instrument – RB.

    Malfunctions/faults

    • THROTTLE MASTER SWITCHES

    3 main throttle master still failed.

    Ricky swaps 3 main and 3 alternate throttle computers, but switch still shows failure – throttle master box is dead. We have confirmed that the #3 MAIN ECU is defective.

    • PRIMARY ENGINE INSTRUMENT GAUGES

    No. 1 EGT indicator is malfunctioning. Ricky re-sets this gauge by altering the tension on it and re-racking it. Problem fixed.

    All primary engine instrument gauges are working now.

    N2 gauge no. 3 is still not re-set, but Ricky says it is OK for now.

    Of the 8 control lanes, only 1 is U/S (unserviceable).

    • SMOKE DETECTORS

    C and K recording detection of smoke – malfunctioning.

    • AIR INTAKE LIGHTS

    No. 3 light flickering; no. 4 light dim. Nothing to worry about – RB.

    • P7 TRANSMITTER

    No. 4 P7 transmitter gauge still fails to work.

    Ricky tries tapping the transmitter mechanism inside the wing, but this does not rectify the problem.

    Ricky then unscrews the gauge and the no. 3 gauge and swaps them round, but the no. 4 transmitter still does not work.

    No. 4 P7 transmitter is U/S.

    Ricky returns to wing and knocks no. 4 P7 transmitter; gauge goes still.

    P7 transmitter gauges now read as follows:

    • No. 1: 14.0 psi

    • No. 2: 14.7 psi

    • No. 3: 14.5 psi

    • No. 4: 0.0 psi (disabled).

    • NACELLE/WING OVERHEAT SWITCHES

    Nacelle/wing overheat switch no. 4 is not working.

    Ricky examines the box for the nacelle/wing overheat switches. He finds that the box (fire protection control unit) needs to be changed. Ricky removes the box. Stored in rear hold.

    • AIR INTAKES

    1B and 4B air intake lanes are U/S. Not investigated as yet.

    • ELECTRICS

    Gen 1 light (just below “Ground power available” switch) is out. Gen 2, 3, 4 are OK. Ricky says Gen 1 might have a bulb failure.

    • NAVIGATION LIGHTS

    Steve de Sausmarez relays a message from outside the aircraft – both nav lights are inoperable.

    • BRAKE FANS

    3.36pm – Ricky tests the brake fans again; no. 1 and no. 4 brake fans do not work. Suspect control relay; to be investigated.

    • FLYING CONTROL COMPUTERS

    Circuit breaker for no. 2 yaw artificial feel computer is tripping. Ricky leaves the circuit breaker in, then turns off power on the aircraft. He removes the artificial feel computer from its rack, and finds that it is burnt out. Again, stored in rear cargo hold.

    • RADIO ALTIMETERS

    Both radio altimeters are inoperable. To be investigated.

    • EXTRACTOR FANS

    Ricky examines circuit breaker for right-hand extractor fan – it still trips.

    • AIRCRAFT WEIGHT + FUEL REMAINING INDICATOR

    One digit on this instrument is not working. Swap the instrument with one from another aircraft (e.g. Alpha Alpha)? Yes, we need some spares – RB.

    • FLIGHT CREW SEATS

    Captain’s seat will not motor rearwards.

    Flight engineer’s seat will not motor forwards. Interference switch on E/O’s seat trolley is jammed in, causing defects.

    • TCAS

    Co-pilot’s TCAS screen has been smashed. Spares from OAA?

    Items removed from aircraft

    • Artificial feel computer

    No. 60801-115

    Code: 00/003/254/02

    • Graviner DC control unit

    Part no. 244D

    Serial no. 034

    Code: 66-331-129-00

    (Contains case assembly: 66-331-129-21; 8 card assemblies: 66-331-118-22; 2 card assemblies: 66-331-129-23.)

    Replacement items needed

    Ricky says we need a new engine computer and new P7 transmitter.

    Need replacement nav lights?

    Meeting between Natalie Kelly, Steve de Sausmarez, and Ellie Bastin

    Ellie relays to rest of team that Swissport will not lend us a GPU for free again – next time they would like us to pay.

    Steve says that Natalie has been through the contract for display of Alpha Charlie, and has discussed it with the legal department at the airport. She says there is nothing in the contract to forbid anyone from powering the aircraft.

    Contract includes decommissioning report, list of items taken off the aircraft and re-used or disposed of, terms and conditions for display of aircraft. It says “Any maintenance is down to the museum”, and “It is not permitted to use the aircraft to promote another company – British Airways retains the right to use the aircraft for their own promotional purposes”.

    Steve has told Natalie that we are setting up a bank account to collect money for Concorde. Natalie is OK with this.

    Concluding points

    Ellie Bastin raises issue of tour guides coming on board the aircraft while the aircraft is live and the team is working. In particular, she mentions one guide who came on board and started pushing buttons. She says it will be helpful if the museum is stricter as regards who comes on board.

    Problems identified 26/08/2011

    PROBLEM STATUS

    Co-pilot’s curved visor panel shattered. Shattered panel removed.

    Replacement curved visor panel fitted.

    Repair completed 18/07/2011.

    Co-pilot’s main windshield cracked. Replacement part taken to GKN for re-glazing. Ongoing.

    Captain’s DV window mechanism broken. Replacement rollers obtained, but bolts and 5/16” nuts needed for fitting them. Ongoing.

    Bolts had to be drilled out on inboard glazing strip for curved visor panel. 4 bolts to be supplied (Boeing type?).

    Aft bolt stub needs to be drilled out. To be done.

    Bolt missing from visor side panel window. Extra bolt fitted to stabilise panel.

    Braces immobilising rudder to be removed before filling of hydraulic system. Repair completed 18/07/2011.

    Main landing gear tyres to be re-filled with nitrogen. Nitrogen added 08/08/2011; further filling to be carried out.

    Nose oleo to be re-filled with nitrogen. To be done.

    All 4 reheat switches jammed in “on” position. Repair completed 14/03/2011.

    Right-hand rear extract fan tripping the circuit breaker. To be done.

    #2, 3, 4 nacelle overheat warning switches set permanently on. To be done.

    Microphone jack panel missing (l/h side, behind jump seat). Jack panel removed from the space designed for the flight deck door entry panel unit, and re-fitted in its correct place.

    Repair completed 18/07/2011.

    Flight deck door entry panel unit missing. New unit supplied and fitted.

    Repair completed 18/07/2011.

    Oven door handle outside cockpit is broken. New roll pin fitted.

    Repair completed 08/08/2011.

    No. 3 TRU switch broken. Needs to be replaced. Ricky has moved it into the “up” position for now. Ongoing.

    Two bulbs gone in forward galley. To be replaced.

    Steps for next visit

    More hydraulic fluid to be supplied and added to systems – possibly from another Concorde.

    Ground hydraulic pumps to be swapped over.

    DV window to be repaired.

    Steps for following visits

    Once hydraulic systems topped up, nose and visor mechanism to be tested.

    Replace the cracked windshield.

    Contact Museum of Flight, East Fortune, to ask if we can collect some spare parts from G-BOAA (e.g. Graviner box).

    Nitrogen to be supplied for further filling of tyres and recharging of nose oleo.

    Items to be brought for future visits

    • Spare ground power unit to be borrowed again

    • Power cable for GPU

    • Additional hydraulic fluid – either M2V or military equivalent

    • Replacement fire detection box (FFFD/ Graviner box)

    • Replacement engine computer

    • Replacement P7 transmitter

    • Replacement artificial feel computer no. 2

    • Engine oil gun

    • Nitrogen (3000 psi) – at least 3 more bottles

    • 5/16” bolts for fitting rollers to DV window

    • 4 bolts for curved visor panel (inboard glazing strip)

    • 2 x 28-volt lead acid aircraft batteries (eg from Boeing 737) to fix nacelle overheats x 3

    • Replacement reheat switches

    • New light to be fitted under nose

    • New nav lights

    • Spare roll pins for oven doors

    • 10 x nipple covers for tyre valves

    • Extra ground power protection unit as spare – perhaps from East Fortune?

    PROJECT CANCELLED  – SEPTEMBER 1ST 2011

    Comments are closed.